What is Dexa?

DEXA — dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry — scans provide a unique three-compartment model for the most accurate and precise segmented analysis of body fat percentage and lean tissue (arms, legs, trunk and total body), visceral fat quantification in the abdominal region, and bone density scoring for key regions of interest.
Traditionally, DEXA has been known as a bone density modality. It’s become recognized, though, as a machine that offers a dynamic range of applications in addition to bone mineral density. They include baseline testing and progress monitoring in areas such as:

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Weight Loss

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Fitness

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Visceral fat quantification for cardio-metabolic risk assessment

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Muscle symmetry for athletic performance, growth, and development.

Who should get the scan and why?

Irrespective of a person’s gender, age, relative health, or family history, DEXA scans can provide a wealth of essential information. And because a DEXA scan carries no discernable level of risk* and involves no discomfort before, during, or afterward, there is no reason to exclude it from a comprehensive health checkup. But don't take our word for it. Watch our video below from Dr. Desmond Ebanks explaining why looking at BMI and scale numbers don't tell the full story, and how getting a DEXA scan by one of our authorized DEXA+ partners can help you get a more accurate representation of your overall health.

*Women who are pregnant should avoid all procedures that involve x-ray technology regardless of dose.

How DEXA Stacks Up

DEXA body composition scanning gives deeper insights than just body fat percentage. It helps define critical health markers such as visceral fat levels and bone mineral density, making it one of the most useful advances in technology visually see a person's health.

Body Scan

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No other technique comes close to a DEXA scan’s precision. A DEXA body composition scan can:

Identify the exact location and amounts of health-damaging fat throughout your body.

Raise a red flag when bone density and muscle mass reach dangerous lows

BMI Formula

The popular body mass index (BMI) formula used to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy weight is more than 180 years old.

Hydrostatic Underwater Weighing

This technique requires submersion into a tank of water three times.

Patient discomfort is notable: patients must expel all the air from their lungs and remain motionless while being weighed … and they must do this three separate times.

Calipers

Imprecise locating of the appropriate areas to measure renders the test practically worthless.

Formulas used as a part of this test require assumptions that do not apply to every person being tested.